POPULAR YACHTING DESTINATIONS

From hidden bays and secret beaches to the best nightlife spots and cruising

itineraries our experienced team reveal the best yachting destinations.

We have selected for you the most top and popular destinations (see below).

Sounio

Cape Sounio is the promontory at the southernmost tip of the Attic peninsula, 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) south of the town of Lavrio (ancient Thoricus), and 70 kilometres (43 mi) southeast of Athens. It is part of Lavreotiki municipality, East Attica, Greece. Cape Sounio is noted for its Temple of Poseidon, one of the major monuments of the Golden Age of Athens. Its remains are perched on the headland, surrounded on three sides by the sea.

Cape Sounio a popular day-excursion for tourists from Athens, with the sunset over the Aegean Sea, as viewed from the ruins, a sought-after sight since the first development of modern tourism in the early 19th century. Lavreotiki municipality was established in 1890 under the name of Sounio, but renamed to Lavreotiki in 1891. Cape Sounio itself is located between the villages of Kato Sounio and Legena. The Sounio national park  was established in 1974 with a core area of 750 hectares.

Vouliagmeni

Vouliagmeni is a seaside town and former municipality 20 km south of Athens, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Vari-Voula-Vouliagmeni, of which it is a municipal unit. The municipal unit has an area of 5.805 km2. Its population was 4,180 at the 2011 census. In 1993 and again in 2009, it hosted the annual meeting of the Bilderberg Group. The suburb is named after Lake Vouliagmeni, located in its vicinity.

Vouliagmeni sits on the southwestern foot of the Hymettus mountain range. It is bisected by a palm tree lined boulevard, Athinas Avenue, which arrives from Athens as Vouliagmenis Avenue, then runs parallel to the seashore and continues southwards. The area east of the main road is the rocky slope of a foothill of Mount Hymettus, and the bulk of the town is built there, along with the local elementary school, post office, banks and town hall.

Poros

Poros is a small Greek island-pair in the southern part of the Saronic Gulf, about 58 km (36 mi) (31 nautical miles) south from Piraeus and separated from the Peloponnese by a 200 m (656 ft) wide sea channel, with the town of Galatas on the mainland across the strait. Its surface area is about 31 square kilometres (12 sq mi) and it has 3,780 inhabitants.

The ancient name of Poros was Pogon. Like other ports in the Saronic, it is a popular weekend destination for Athenian travellers. Poros consists of two islands: Sphairia, the southern part, which is of volcanic origin, where today’s city is located, and Kalaureia, also Kalavria or Calauria (meaning ‘gentle breeze’), the northern and largest part. A bridge connects the two islands over a narrow strait. Poros is an island with rich vegetation. Much of the northern and far eastern/western sides of the island are bushy, whereas large areas of old pine forest are found in the south and center of the island.

Aegina

Aegina is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece in the Saronic Gulf, 27 kilometres (17 miles) from Athens. Tradition derives the name from Aegina the mother of the hero Aeacus, who was born on the island and became its king. During ancient times Aegina was a rival of Athens, the great sea power of the era.

Aegina is roughly triangular in shape, approximately 15 km (9.3 mi) from east to west and 10 km (6.2 mi) from north to south, with an area of 87.41 km2 (33.75 sq mi). An extinct volcano constitutes two-thirds of Aegina. The northern and western sides consist of stony but fertile plains, which are well cultivated and produce luxuriant crops of grain, with some cotton, vines, almonds, olives and figs, but the most characteristic crop of Aegina today (2000s) is pistachio. Economically, the sponge fisheries are of notable importance.

Agistri

Agistri, also Angistri or Agkistri, is a small island and municipality in the Saronic Gulf in the Islands regional unit, Greece. There are only three settlements on Agistri – Milos (Megalochori), Skala and Limenaria. Milos (pop. 566) is the main village where the majority of the Greek population of the island lives.

Skala (pop. 448) is a twenty-minute walk from Milos along the coastal road. Skala is where most of the tourist facilities and hotels are. Limenaria (pop. 128) is a very small village on the other side of the island with very little tourism. The island’s population is 1,142 inhabitants according to the 2011 Greek census. Its land area is 13.367 km2 (5.161 sq mi). Agistri is a pine-covered island in the Saronic Islands group. Agistri is very close to the larger Saronic island of Aegina. The island can be reached from Aegina by a number of boats in just ten minutes.

Hydra

Hydra is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece, located in the Aegean Sea between the Saronic Gulf and the Argolic Gulf. It is separated from the Peloponnese by a narrow strip of water. In ancient times, the island was known as Hydrea, a reference to the natural springs on the island. The municipality of Hydra consists of the islands Hydra (pop. 1948, area 49.6 km2 (19.2 sq mi)), Dokos (pop. 18, area 13.5 km2 (5.2 sq mi)), and a few uninhabited islets, total area 64.443 km2 (24.9 sq mi).

The province of Hydra was one of the provinces of the Piraeus Prefecture. Its territory corresponded with that of the current municipality. It was abolished in 2006. There is one main town, known simply as “Hydra port” (pop. 1,900 in 2011). It consists of a crescent-shaped harbor, around which is centered a strand of restaurants, shops, markets, and galleries that cater to tourists and locals (Hydriots). Steep stone streets lead up and outward from the harbor area.

Fleves

Fleves is a small, abandoned and fairly dry island south of the seaside resort of Vouliagmeni on the Greek mainland. The small island rises out of the turqoise see with its high white steep cliffs and is mostly covered with low bushes. There are sea caves along the coast. Fleves is popular with project developers that want to turn the island into a luxurious holiday paradise.

So far that has not happened and nature action groups will try to prevent this from happening. The island is now the domain of the fishermen and of divers that want to explore the many old sunken boats that are scattered around the island, including boats from the ancient period (with amphorae, etc). The Greek islet of Fleves in the Saronic Gulf just off Vouliagmeni Bay, which is property of the Greek Defence Ministry is up for sale and it’s reported two investors have already expressed keen interest.

Spetses

Spetses is an affluent island and a municipality in the Islands regional unit, Attica, Greece. It is sometimes included as one of the Saronic Islands. Until 1948, it was part of the old prefecture of Argolidocorinthia, which is now split into Argolis and Corinthia.

In ancient times, it was known as Pityoussa, and later as Petses. The island is now an independent municipality (pop. 4,027), with no internal boundaries within the municipality. The town of Spetses (pop. 4,001 in 2011) is the only large settlement on the island. The other settlements on the island are Moní Agíon Pánton (pop. 0), Ligonéri (4), Ágioi Anárgyroi (18), Kouzoúnos (4). Also part of the Municipality of Spetses are the islands of Spetsopoula, Falkonera, and Velopoula (all uninhabited). The municipality has an area of 27.121 km2. An unusual aspect of Spetses is the absence of private automobiles in the town limits. The most common modes of transport are walking, horse-drawn carriages, bicycles, mopeds, and motorcycles. Only taxis and delivery vehicles are allowed in the downtown area.